Color Temperature Chart

Color Temperature Chart

One of the most important things to consider when you make a lighting purchase is to know what color temperature you are looking.  A color’s temperature is measured in degrees of Kelvin and describes how the light will appear when you look directly at a fixture.  Below we will attempt to help you better understand how to determine what you are looking for. 

The easiest way to describe how to understand the effects of temperature and color of the light that is given off is to envision looking into a fire.  When you see yellow flames it would represent what is called warm white.  As you move up in temperature the color moves more towards the blue (AKA daylight) end of the spectrum.  Below you will see a description of the most common ranges of color temperature in terms of lighting. 

Warm White 2400K-3000K

Customers that enjoy warmer tones tend to fall into this range which match up with incandescent light bulbs that are in the range of 2700K - 2800K.  These light bulbs and fixtures that mimic warm white (more yellow) color temperature are typically used in restaurant lighting, residential lighting, hotel walk ways and rooms and spaces where a warm ambiance is what is needed to set the mood.

Neutral White 3500K

Neutral White is a very popular color temperature because it falls in the middle of the warm white 3000K and cool white 4000K spectrum range.  This color temperature is widely use in to offices and commercial buildings. 

Cool White 4000K-4300K

Cool white is also very popular color temperature used in offices and commercial buildings.   When you move into this range of the color scale you start to get some yellows to show up and more blemished white light. 

Full Spectrum 5000K-5700K

Full Spectrum is a term used to describe light that is very balanced.  Typically when you get to 5000K-5700K color range you visually start to see a very white crisp clean look which is appealing for modern environments, paint booths, gas stations, hospitals and some office environments. 

Daylight 6500K

The term daylight doesn’t mean that this color temperature range would be the same as the light given from the sun.  With daylight color range you will still have what appears to be a bright light as with in the full spectrum color range but you will notice the blue light start to take over the of color.